Aviation Maintenance

Graduate Capstone Course
Online Course Syllabus
Credit Hours: 3
Delivery Method: Online (Internet /Canvas)
Required Course Materials.

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American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the
American Psychological Association
(6th ed.). Washington, DC:
Author.
ISBN: 978-1-4338-0561-5
(APA website:
http://www.apastyle.org/manual/index.aspx)

Course Description
The Master of Science in Aeronautics Capstone Course is the culminating effort of the student’s
entire learning experience. The student will complete a project or comprehensive exam that
provides significant evidence of experience in aviation and aeronautical studies. Students will
work with designated faculty to formulate, develop, and complete the aviation/aerospace project
or exam. The completion of the Capstone Course is designed to document significant evidence
that all Program Outcomes have been met, and provides the student evidence of experience to
show to current and prospective employers. The Capstone Course will be taken at the end of
the student’s degree program.
Note: ASCI 691 must be taken as the final course in the MSA program. With approval from the
appropriate Dean, a student may undertake ASCI 691 in parallel with
ONE final course only, as
long as either 605 (for students in catalog years prior to 2010) or 665 and 670 (for students in
catalog years 2010 and beyond) have been successfully completed. Students in catalog years
prior to 2010 may take 691 as an equivalent course to 690.
Prerequisite(s): RSCH 665 and RSCH 670
Course Goals
The goal of the Master of Science in Aeronautics Capstone Course is to provide an opportunity
for students to demonstrate they have met all Program Outcomes. Students will be given the
option of working on an individual project or completing an individual comprehensive
examination that is aligned with Program Outcomes. Projects and comprehensive examinations

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will require extensive research, critical thought and statistical analysis that supports the
project/examination and Program Outcomes. Students are required to present their project or
defend their comprehensive examination, as applicable.
PROGRAM OUTCOMES:
Program Outcomes 1 – 4 are the MSA Core Competency Outcomes.
1. Students will be able to apply the fundamentals of air transportation as part of a global,
multimodal transportation system, including the technological, social, environmental, and
political aspects of the system to examine, compare, analyze and recommend
conclusion.
2. The student will be able to identify and apply appropriate statistical analysis, to include
techniques in data collection, review, critique, interpretation and inference in the aviation
and aerospace industry.
3. The student will be able across all subjects to use the fundamentals of human factors in
all aspects of the aviation and aerospace industry, including unsafe acts, attitudes,
errors, human behavior, and human limitations as they relate to the aviators adaption to
the aviation environment to reach conclusions.
4. The student will be able to develop and/or apply current aviation and industry related
research methods, including problem identification, hypothesis formulation, and
interpretation of findings to present as solutions in the investigation of an aviation /
aerospace related topic.
Program Outcomes 5 – 12 are the MSA Specialization Outcomes
5. Aeronautics
The student will investigate, compare, contrast, analyze and form conclusions to current
aviation, aerospace, and industry related topics in aeronautics, including advanced
aerodynamics, advanced aircraft performance, simulation systems, crew resource
management, advanced meteorology, rotorcraft operations and advanced
aircraft/spacecraft systems.
6. Aviation Aerospace Education Technology
The student will investigate, compare, contrast, analyze and form conclusions to current
aviation, aerospace, and industry related topics in education technology, including
computer based instruction, simulation systems, education foundations, curriculum
development, continuing education, adult teaching and learning techniques, and memory
and cognition.
7. Aviation Aerospace Management
The student will investigate, compare, contrast, analyze and form conclusions to current
aviation, aerospace, and industry related topics in management, including aircraft
maintenance, industrial safety, production and procurement, international policy,
research and development, logistics, airport operations, and airline operations.

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8. Aviation Aerospace Operations
The student will investigate, compare, contrast, analyze and form conclusions to current
aviation, aerospace, and industry related topics in operations, including simulation
systems, operations research, rotorcraft operations, communication and control
systems, air carrier operations, and corporate operations.
9. Aviation Aerospace Safety Systems
The student will investigate, compare, contrast, analyze and form conclusions to current
aviation, aerospace, and industry related topics in safety systems, including systems
safety, industrial safety, accident investigation and analysis, transportation security,
airport safety and certification, safety program management, and aviation psychology.
10. Human Factors in Aviation Systems
The student will investigate, compare, contrast, analyze and form conclusions to current
aviation, aerospace, and industry related topics in human factors, including psychology,
sensation and perception, human-computer interaction, memory and cognition, and
applied experimental design.
11. Space Studies
The student will investigate, compare, contrast, analyze and form conclusions to current
aviation, aerospace, and industry related topics in space studies, including earth
observation and remote sensing, mission and launch operations, habitation and life
support systems, and applications in space commerce, defense, and exploration.
12. Space Operations and Management
The student will understand and be able to apply and solve problems presented to
current aviation, aerospace, and industry related topics in space operations, including
earth observation and remote sensing, mission and launch operations, habitation and life
support systems, and applications in space commerce, defense, and exploration,
operations research, information management, advanced planning systems, and
production and procurement.
13. Unmanned Aerospace Systems
The student will investigate, compare, contrast, analyze and form conclusions to current
aviation, aerospace, and industry-related topics in unmanned aircraft and spacecraft
systems, including UAS systems, robotics and control, unmanned systems operations
and payloads, and human factors in unmanned systems.
14. Air Traffic Management
Students will be able to apply practices for managing an Air Traffic System in a global
environment.
15. Small Unmanned Aircraft System (sUAS) Operation
Students will be able to apply and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities
specific to the safe, responsible, and effective operation of small unmanned aircraft
systems.

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Guidelines
Students register for the ASCI 691 Graduate Capstone Course the same as other courses.
Students may work with any approved delivery modality to facilitate course completion.
Students will complete either the project or the comprehensive examination as a requirement of
the course. Student registrations may dictate which options are available.
The proposal for the project or comprehensive exam must specifically address
how each
applicable Program Outcome will be met
. The proposal must list each question or a detailed
explanation of the project. Methodology must include what statistical analysis will be conducted
must also be included in the proposal. The student’s program specialization(s) must be
identified in the proposal.
Project Option:
The project option, either an Individual Project or a Comprehensive Exam, will be determined at
the beginning of the term. Project size and structure will be determined by the faculty member.
The faculty member will guide the development, focus and scope of the project. The project
must be comprehensive, relevant, include statistical analysis with a structured methodology and
address all applicable Program Outcomes.
The project proposal must be submitted to the faculty member and proposal approver for review
no later than the end of Module 2. Review and feedback of the proposal will be accomplished
within five (5) working days of receipt.
The proposal must:
Define the scope and depth of the project to include statistical analysis techniques and
research methodologies.
Explain how the project will support the student’s attainment of all applicable Program
Outcomes.
Detail how the final product will be presented.
The project must address all core Program Outcomes and applicable Specialization
Program Outcomes.
The final project is due no later than Module 7.
The instructor will provide constructive feedback that includes the grading rubrics and specific
comments regarding the project and defense.
A rubric is provided to faculty and students for grading the project. In order to provide consistent
grading and assessment of outcomes, the rubric should not be changed or modified, unless
approved by the Graduate Studies Department Chair or MSA Program Chair.
An additional rubric is provided to assess individual students in meeting Program Outcomes. In
order to provide consistent grading and assessment of outcomes, the rubric should not be
changed or modified, unless approved by the Graduate Studies Department Chair or MSA
Program Chair.

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Comprehensive Examination Option:
The comprehensive examination is an individual effort that includes the development of
comprehensive examination questions and an in-depth research and statistical analysis effort to
answer those questions.
The faculty member will guide the student in developing five (5) comprehensive examination
questions that suitably address all Core Program Outcomes and applicable Specialization
Program Outcomes. The faculty has an option to replace two (2), adding two (2) additional
questions of their own or from a question pool developed by Graduate Studies Department
faculty, for a total of five (5) questions to be researched and answered by the student
Each of the comprehensive exam questions must be constructed so that the response
will demonstrate the student has met one or more of the applicable Program Outcomes.
The comprehensive examination questions, in their entirety, will address all core
Program Outcomes and applicable Specialization Program Outcomes.
The final comprehensive examination questions to be researched and answered must be
submitted to the faculty member and proposal approver for review no later than the end of
Module 2. Review and feedback of the proposal will be accomplished within five (5) working
days of receipt.
The comprehensive examination should be of sufficient length as to fully develop each question
and address all elements of the applicable Program Outcomes. Further guidance will be
provided by the instructor.
The completed comprehensive examination is due to the faculty member no later than Module
7. A defense of the exam to the faculty will be conducted no later than Module 8.
The instructor will provide constructive feedback to the student, which includes the grading
rubrics and specific comments regarding the comprehensive examination and defense.
A rubric is provided to faculty and students for grading the comprehensive examination. In order
to provide consistent grading and assessment of outcomes, the rubric should not be changed or
modified, unless approved by the Graduate Studies Department Chair or MSA Program Chair.
An additional rubric is provided to assess individual students in meeting Program Outcomes. In
order to provide consistent grading and assessment of outcomes, the rubric should not be
changed or modified, unless approved by the Graduate Studies Department Chair or MSA
Program Chair.
At the completion of the course, a copy of the comprehensive examination/project and the
grading rubrics will be placed in each student’s file for future reference.

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Grading
These are the major assignments in the course and will be the basis for evaluation according to
the grading scale shown in the table below.

Course Grade Scale Evaluation Items & Weights
90 – 100% A Overall Project/Comprehensive Exam Rubric #1 50%
80 – 89% B Core Program Outcomes Rubric #2 40%
70 – 79% C Specialization Program Outcome Rubric #3 10%*
0 – 69% F Total 100%

*5% each of dual specialization.
Course Incompletion
Incomplete grades are not offered for the ASCI 691 Graduate Capstone Course. If the project is
not completed within the term registered, the faculty member must post an “F” grade or an “IP”
(in progress) grade. The “IP” grade requires the students to enroll in ASCI 691C the following
term at the cost of one credit hour. If the student does not satisfactorily complete the project by
the end of the ASCI 691C term, an “F” grade will be recorded in the original 691 section. Only
one ASCI 691C course is available.
Institutional Review Board
The University fully complies with the policy on the use of human subjects as required by the
Public Health Service (PHS) (45 CFR 46 as revised). Any proposal involving human subjects,
as defined by 45 CFR 46, requires approval by the University Institutional Review
Board (IRB) for the Protection of Human Subjects. Any capstone student who plans to conduct
research using human subjects must contact their faculty member to obtain approval in
accordance with University policy.
Library
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University has one of the most complete library collections of
aviation-related resources in the world.
Hunt Library Worldwide: Information, Services, Help
o Library Basic Training
o Ask-a-Librarian
Contact Information
Hours: Mon-Thu. 8a.m.-10p.m., Fri. 8a.m.-6p.m., Sat 12p.m.-6p.m., Sun 2p.m.-10p.m. EST
Page 7 of 9

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Telephone: 1-800-678-9428 or 386-226-7656
Email: library@erau.edu
Additional Information
Online Sources
aaae.org
alpa.org
apoa.org
cdc.gov
cdc.gov/niosh
criticalthinking.org
dhs.gov
dot.gov
epa.gov
faa.gov
iata.org
icao.int
iea.org
infoitglobal.info
mindtools.com
nasa.gov
nbaa.org
niosh.gov
ntsb.gov
osha.gov
pama.org
pmi.org
rotor.com
sole.org tsa.gov
Course Policies
Academic Integrity
Embry-Riddle is committed to maintaining and upholding intellectual integrity. All students,
faculty, and staff have obligations to prevent violations of academic integrity and take corrective
action when they occur. The adjudication process will involve imposing sanctions which may
include, but are not limited to, a failing grade on the assignment, a failing grade in a course,
suspension or dismissal from the University, upon students who commit the following academic
violations:
1.
Plagiarism: Presenting the ideas, words, or products of another as one’s own. Plagiarism
includes use of any source to complete academic assignments without proper
acknowledgement of the source. Reuse or resubmission of a student’s own coursework if
previously used or submitted in another course, is considered self-plagiarism, and is also
not allowed under University policy.

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2. Cheating: A broad term that includes, but is not limited to, the following:
a. Giving or receiving help from unauthorized persons or materials during examinations.
b. The unauthorized communication of examination questions prior to, during, or
following administration of the examination.
c. Collaboration on examinations or assignments expected to be, or presented as,
individual work.
d. Fraud and deceit, that include knowingly furnishing false or misleading information or
failing to furnish appropriate information when requested, such as when applying for
admission to the University.
Note: The Instructor reserves the right to use any form of digital method for checking
plagiarism. Several electronic systems are available and other methods may be used at the
Instructor’s discretion.
Online Learning
This course is offered through Embry-Riddle Online (Canvas) and runs nine (9) weeks. The first
week begins the first day of the term and ends at midnight EDT/EST (as applicable) seven days
later. Success in this course requires in-depth study of each module as assigned, timely
completion of assignments, and regular participation in forum discussions.
Late work should be the exception and not the rule and may be downgraded at the discretion of
the Instructor, if accepted at all. Unless all work is submitted, the student could receive a failing
grade for the course. Extensions may be granted for extenuating circumstances at the discretion
of the Instructor and only for the length of time the Instructor deems appropriate. The most
important element of success in an online course is to communicate with your Instructor
throughout the term.
Conventions of “online etiquette,” which include courtesy to all users, will be observed. Students
should use the Send Message function in Canvas for private messages to the Instructor and
other students. The class Discussion Board is for public messages.
It is highly recommended that students keep electronic copies of all materials submitted as
assignments, discussion board posts and emails, until after the end of the term and a final grade
is received. When posting responses in a discussion forum, please confirm that the responses
have actually been posted after you submit them.
The course schedule begins on next page
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Course Schedule

Module 1 4.5 hours
Introduction to the course and determining course requirements is accomplished. Criteria to
include methodology and statistical analysis techniques for the project and/or comprehensive
examination questions are determined and initial work is started in developing the
project/questions. The instructor will work with the student, as applicable, in the initial
development of the project/comprehensive examination questions.

 

Module 2 4.5 hours
The project proposal will be submitted to the instructor. The instructor will review and
recommend any modifications necessary to approve the project. Details of the project are
discussed and agreed upon.
or
The faculty member will guide the student in developing five (5) comprehensive examination
questions that suitably address all applicable Program Outcomes. Faculty have the option to
replace two (2) of the student developed questions with two (2) questions of their own or from a
question pool developed by Graduate Studies Department faculty. Subsequently, a total of five
(5) questions that thoroughly address all the applicable Program Outcomes are developed /
provided to be researched and answered by the student.
No later than the end of Module 2
The project proposal/comprehensive exam is submitted to the instructor for review and
approval.

 

Module 3 – 7 4.5 hours/ week
Modules 3 – 7 are used to research and analyze the projects/questions. The instructor will be
available through the discussion board, e-mail, phone, and or scheduled classroom time to
provide any assistance necessary. Weekly progress checks will be conducted to ensure work is
on track.
No later than the end of Module 7
The final project/comprehensive exam is submitted to the faculty member for grading.

 

Module 8 4.5 hours
A formal presentation and defense of the project/comprehensive examination is scheduled for
this module.

 

Module 9 4.5 hours
The instructor will provide feedback regarding the project/comprehensive examination. The
instructor will conduct a comprehensive review of the rubrics used for grading the
project/comprehensive examination and presentations. A final grade will be assigned and end of
course evaluations completed.

 

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